TS Overdrive – new enclosure & sound samples

Old enclosure ready for tear-down

Old enclosure ready for tear-down, next to the new one.

Why?

When I built my first Tubescreamer clone (built with a great circuit board from DIY Effects) I was very pleased but left with a few issues that at the time I could not be bothered to fix.

Firstly, the paint finish I used on the enclosure did not turn out very well. I used Rustoleum, and sprayed it on way too thick (because I was impatient…lesson learned). It looked cool, but it didn’t wear well.

Secondly, the DC power connector I originally bought for it turned out to be the wrong size. I only discovered this when I got hold of a power supply, and it didn’t fit. In fact, it was at this point that I tried to use what I thought was an adapter for a smaller power connector. Little did I know that although the adapter fit, it was actually a polarity inverter too; so I blew up 3 JC4558 chips in the process.

So I decided to try an enclosure from Mammoth Electronics, who can provide a painted an drilled enclosure for around $10. Ridiculously cheap.

Wires for the LED "off-board"

Wires for the LED "off-board"

Getting on with it

The rehousing process was very easy; mostly a case of taking the old one apart and carefully assembling it all back into the new¬†enclosure. I did have to redo the LED as the DIY Effects PCB allows you to solder it directly to the board, and let it just stick through the¬†enclosure. I couldn’t do that with the new enclosure and still have it line up with the hole, so I attached wires to the LED and then soldered those to the board. Nice and easy.

The shiny copper on the MOSFET clippers

The shiny copper on the MOSFET clippers

Clipping with MOSFETs

Months ago, after I built my OD2 which uses plain diodes for clipping, I decided to change this OD to use MOSFET clipping. SLW had mentioned it in the excellent PDF file that lays out instructions for building the pedal, and he rated it highly. I was able to purchase the parts easily, and after doing the necessary physical modification (i.e. cutting off most of the mounting lug) the mod was trivial. But what a result in terms of sound! You’ll hopefully hear in the MP3 file below that it has a wonderfully soft clip. It’s as if it has rounded edges. Like an overdriven Marshall, but without the harshness. It does definitely get harsh if you turn the tone all the way up, and responds very well to tone adjustments on the guitar itself. In the clip you’ll hear a variety of pickups and guitar tone control settings (and sadly a lot of repetitive playing).

The setup was:

  • My own build of an AX84 P1 Extreme, with a 6V6 for the output section.
  • Tokai Les Paul with a 1961 Gibson PAF in the neck, and a modern Seymour Duncan JB in the bridge.
  • 2×12 cab with Celestion G12T-75
  • SM57 microphone
  • Recorded in Logic on a Mac. And a touch of reverb in the master output channel.

Click here for the MP3

Almost done

Almost done

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3 thoughts on “TS Overdrive – new enclosure & sound samples

  1. [...] new enclosure, different clipping method, and a sound sample. Final assembly of the TS OD from DIY Effects GA_googleAddAttr("AdOpt", "1"); [...]

  2. Nick Samuelson says:

    Very cool! Sounds great! How much did this total build cost? I’m looking into various options for building myself a TS-808 clone, and interested in knowing how much this one would run.

    • Thanks for the kind words!
      The whole thing cost about $40, if memory serves me well. The PCB from DIYEffects.com was/is $10. Thehttp://hotbottles.wordpress.com/2011/03/15/ts-overdrive-new-enclosure-sound-samples/?replytocom=73#respondy have more options now too with the revised layout. The components and the enclosure made up the rest.

      This beats the hand-built price of a ‘real’ 808 by a considerable margin ;)

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