Building a TS Overdrive – from DIY Effects

Adhoc workstation

Here's the board with the instructions on the left. All the components were in neatly labelled baggies.

After my initial trepidation about which transistor to use (and with some patient guidance from Shawn at DIY Effects) I was ready to build the TS Overdrive guitar effects pedal. I’d read the build document many times as I learned from building my AX84 P1 eXtreme that you can never go over this stuff too much.

Components

So step one was to start installing components and get soldering.  I had my less powerful 15W iron this time as it has a smaller tip and will be less likely to cook any components. I also brought out my very handy clip stand device, which helped me hold components as I assembled them. It also has a magnifying glass attached…very handy. I began with resistors, then moved onto capacitors (electrolytic first). Then it was the IC socket and transistors.

Standard TS 808 clipping diodes

Standard TS 808 clipping diodes. There are many options available here.

Clipping options and transistors

There are several options included with the board design that allow for different clipping methods. You can use the stock diodes, or MOSFETs or even LEDs. I went for the original method (which is regular diodes in position D1 and D3. D2 gets jumpered) because I wanted to hear what the original TS 808 circuit sounds like. These things are legend and I’d never had one in my arsenal before. As mentioned in the previous post, I had an issue getting hold of the prescribed MPSA18 transistors and in the end found an assortment of general purpose ones at Radio Shack. So this build used a pair of 2N3904 transistors.

Heat shrink on the pot terminals

Heat shrink on the pot terminals

The remainder of the build went very well. It really was a case of following the build notes, and carefully marking off each component (or indeed wire) as I assembled it. I knew that the board had to mount on top of the pots so I was careful to heat-shrink the wires coming off the pots themselves; I didn’t want any random wires to short out parts of the circuit.

Final assembly

This was tricky for a few reasons:

  • I used solid-core 20AWG wire. This mean that while the wires stayed where I put them, it also meant it was harder to orient the board. See next point.
  • Rats nest of wires

    Rats nest of wires, but it's physically sound and ready to go!

    The holes in the pre-drilled enclosure from Pedals Parts were such that I had to choose between having the tone pot right near the top of the pedal (which looked crap) or the tone pot near the stomp switch. I opted for the latter, but that meant the board had to be oriented the other way round, which then meant the wires I had already soldered in were about an inch too short. Coupled with them being sold core and the result was physically sound, but looked really messy.

Fire it up!

Almost done

Almost done. The view through the looking glass!

So all that remained was to solder in the LED, and put the knobs on. I’d failed to order a bezel for the LED, so right now it’s just kind of floating there. The knobs went on easily, and look good. After using a mix of Alpha and CTS pots on my amp build, I must say I like the action on these Alphas. The CTS pots I used on the amp were nylon shaft whereas these are solid aluminium which feels so much better.

Next step was to plug in a battery, screw on the back, and fire it up. And I must say it sounds excellent! I dialed my amp to be as clean as it gets…i.e. no pre-amp distortion/saturation, and dialed the TS OD to be a clean boost (no Distortion, Level just a bit louder). Harder to  dial in was the Tone. The documents are correct when they say that most of the range is at the end of the knob’s travel, so there’s a kind of sweet spot where you get some good “bite, but it’s not harsh. With the tone on maximum it can be a bit “fizzy”.

Result!

From here on I jammed for quite some time, punctuated by twiddling with the knobs on the pedal. It was hard to make it sound bad, to be honest. It’s definitely not a high gain machine, but I wasn’t expecting one (and that’s why I got the Boss DS-1). It’s a fantastic blues overdrive that works well with single-coils as well as humbuckers or P90s. If my SM57 wasn’t broken (might be the cable) I’d record some samples.

I plan to do a number of things from here:

  • Try different clipping options.
  • Try different transistors.
  • Re-finish the enclosure. This Hammerite stuff isn’t pretty. It’s been a week and it hasn’t dried properly, so I think I sprayed it on too thick. I’d probably go for green enamel as a nod to the original Ibanez TS 808 that started all this.
  • Record some samples.
  • Minor adjustments such as mount the pots lower so the knobs don’t stick up so much. Also, buy and install the bezel for the LED (which I might change to blue, just cuz).

UPDATE!

An older version of the DIY Effects board, but with a different/better design.

UPDATE AGAIN!

A new enclosure, different clipping method, and a sound sample.

Final assembly of the TS OD

Final assembly of the TS OD from DIY Effects

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3 thoughts on “Building a TS Overdrive – from DIY Effects

  1. […] UPDATE AGAIN: Here’s the post with all the details of the final build. […]

  2. […] Effects and Potential Project Tags: landgraff, LDO, tubescreamer A few months ago I built a clone of a TS-808 Tubescreamer (based on a PCB and build instructions from DIY Effects) and that proved to be […]

  3. […] I built my first Tubescreamer clone (built with a great circuit board from DIY Effects) I was very pleased but left with a few issues […]

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