Tag Archives: veroboard

Building a “Tremulus Lune” on vero-board

One of my favourite pieces of music, let alone guitar playing, is by Ry Cooder. A track called “Feelin’ Bad Blues”. This video is an excerpt from the film Crossroads where the tune was used to great effect. For me it is the epitome of blues guitar. Sad, slow and gritty. And that thick tremolo (probably from an old Fender amp, not a Pignose) is the icing on the cake.

So that’s what this post is all about; making a pedal to give me that tremolo effect. It didn’t take long to find the defacto standard tremolo pedal; the Tremulus Lune.

Layout

Layout

Layout

Research showed that I could buy a kit, or even a pre-made one, but where’s the fun in that? I went for the layout from Guitar FX Layouts (seen here).

The novelty with this circuit for me was it used a component called a Light Dependent Resistor (LRD). Essentially one part of the circuit is a Low Frequency Oscillator (LFO), controllable with various potentiometers. The ‘low frequency’ part refers to the fact that it is creating a sine-wave in the range of 3-10hz (I haven’t actually measured it). This wave is used to drive a normal op-amp, thus varying amplitude over time, which is in fact the definition of “tremolo”. One difficulty was getting hold of the correct LDRs.  They needed to have the range 5k/500k. It was easy to get hold of all kinds of LDRs, even from Radio Shack, but I had to trawl through Ebay to find the right ones. I have a bag of 20 now.

The build

The finished board

The finished board

This isn’t my first veroboard build, so the build/assembly went quite quickly, in a pleasant way, and I had it operational on my prototype rig within a couple of hours. It sounded amazing! It truly is a versatile tremolo; you really don’t need anything more complex than this.

The device has three LEDs. One for the usual on/off indicator; another one to couple the LFO with the op-amp (by pointing the LED at the LDR, kind of like a vibe pedal does) and a third one to show the speed of the LFO externally. I decided to use the nice fresnel lens LED holders I bought a while ago. I just think they look really cool. The picture below shows them in their full glory, although the red LEDs look somewhat pink. To fit them I needed to get a 17/64ths drill bit. I have hundreds of drill bits, but not that one. So, a trip to Ace Hardware for that.

Fresnel lenses

Fresnel lenses

The enclosure

This one’s got 5 knobs, so I had to use a 1590BB and I chose to go for a vertical orientation. As for a design I went for the whole Crossroads theme. I combined the lyrics to the famous song, and depicted the actual crossroads by using highway signs. As far as the decal goes, I wanted it to wrap over the sides as I thought it would look cool. I printed it on transparent ink jet decal paper this time as the enclosure is bright white.

Drilling the enclosure

Drilling the enclosure

The decal

The decal

Demo Recording

So I finished the assembly and got it all plugged into my usual rig, and recorded a swift demo. As I mentioned earlier, the reason I wanted to build this was for that archetypical blues tone. So here’s my own sloppy rendition of that kind of sound:

Click here for MP3

The setup was: Tokai Les Paul, neck pickup (a humbucker from a 1961 ES-335); my AX84 P1 Extreme into a 2×12″ speaker cab, with Celestions; my Box of Rock clone for some grit, and the Tremulus Lune of course. The reverb came from Logic, and was a ‘small church’ kind of setting.

The finished pedal

The finished pedal

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Building a Z.Vex SHO clone from scratch

In my previous post I had some great success building a very simple boost circuit, the Electroharmonix LPB-1. While learning all about that particular circuit I kept coming across discussion surrounding the Z.Vex SHO; mostly questions of tonal comparison. So I decided to build one of those too, and was greatly excited to find this thread, which spelled it all out for me in simple terms. Here’s the circuit in a simple schematic form (I made it in ExpressSCH (on a Linux box)), then a diagram with some options. And finally one with external components that you’d find on a typical pedal schematic:

My own SHO schematic, with bill-of-materials

My own SHO schematic, with bill-of-materials

ZVex SHO circuit

ZVex SHO “diagram”

Z.Vex SHO schematic

Z.Vex SHO schematic

As you can see, it’s very simple. So much so that a fair few forum members decried it as “too simple” and in fact “retarded”. But I admit to wanting to know how Z.Vex can sell one of these circuits in a pedal for more than $150.

ZVex SHO Updated - from Zach schematic-762360Layout

As with the LPB-1 I wanted to attempt a layout myself, and do it on veroboard. This genuinely was quick easy as this really is a simple circuit. My approach as to keep the relative positions of the components on the schematic. It practically wrote itself. It turns out my own layout was wrong, and non-obvious, so I’ve replaced it (on the left) with a decent layout from Mark at Guitar FX Layouts.

Soldering was simple, and went without drama. I was able to test the circuit within the hour. It worked! When I built it I didn’t have all the hardware, so as you can see from the picture, I used a trim-pot rather than a full-size potentiometer.

SHO clone on veroboard

SHO clone on veroboard

Enclosure

Then the fun part, the enclosure! I’d been wanting to do a decent custom enclosure for quite some time, but never got around to it. This time I decided to make the effort and do something special. First step was to take some good measurements of the enclosure. I had ordered the enclosure from Small Bear, and started by spraying it a lovely fire-engine-red, using Rustoleum paint. That stuff goes on really well and I had no issues with drips or runs.

Decal

Then it came to the decal. I’m not a great designer, or at least not one dripping with amazing ideas for these things, so I looked around at other pedal manufacturers for inspiration. In the end I went for a cheesy tribute to Nigel Tufnel in the spirit of his ‘one louder’ philosophy. With my measurements in hand I used Inkscape to create a set of guides so I would know where all the hardware was going to go on the face of the enclosure. Then I made a simple panel-oriented design that would hopefully go well with the red enclosure. I had deliberately chosen the decal paper that had a white backing to it, so I knew that the upper panel would appear white. I also knew that the gap between them would contain the on/off LED, so that was intentional.

Decal shown in Inkscape

Decal shown in Inkscape

Application

Then it was a case of printing out the design on the water-slide inkjet paper (also purchased from Small Bear). Prior to printing it on the (expensive at $2 per sheet) paper, I did some trial runs on plain paper, just to check for size. You can see in the picture below how the ink looks nice and bold on the real paper compared to the plain paper.

Once printed, I then sprayed a reasonable coat of Rustoleum clear onto the inkjet waterside paper, to seal the ink without letting it run. I was surprised that even after drying for 12 hours the paper was still flexible. Next, I cut out each panel with small, sharp scissors, and made sure it all fit nicely. Finally I soaked each panel in water for about 30 seconds so that the decal was ready to slide off the backing paper. It was simple to apply the decal to the enclosure and get it lined up with the edge. It was most pleasing that my measurements were good, and also that the printer was accurate enough to obey my measurements. After smoothing out the decal with a bit of tissue I left it to dry overnight.

Decal ready to be applied

Decal ready to be applied

Finish

The next day I got things setup to shoot some clearcoats onto the enclosure. I planned on applying 5-6 coats, or until I got bored. This proved easy as long as I kept within the one hour time limit. If I waited longer than that I’d have to wait a further 23 hours to apply another coat.

Assembly

Well, it’s all assembled, and it is fully functional, but I’m not magically happy with the finish. It looks great, but it’s really really soft. It dents easily, even with cloth and finger prints. Maybe this means it will hold up really well to abuse because it won’t chip? Time will tell.

I am however pleased with the LED lenses, which I got from Mouser. Fulltone use a fresnel-type lens on their pedals, which I liked immediately. And to be honest I’m tired of the standard ‘chrome plated cone’ type that I’ve been using up until now. These ones are made by VCC and available from Mouser…try part 593-3210C (tall, like on this booster) or 593-2800C (flatter)

The finished article

The finished article

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